Headache Funeral
Headache Funeral

Cy Young ties his shoes, and asks if the game is over. The game is metaphoric for life. Headache funeral is written in the background with a series of 0's and 9's representing the concept of heaven and hell.

24"x 36"

$3500

We Can Dream
We Can Dream

The subject of this painting is Rube Foster, the originator of the Negro leagues. The white baseline above his head represents the white race line, his hat nearly breaking through.The brown dirt under the baseline represents the skin pigment of the African American players and how they were treated. The black and white image is of Foster and his wife. She was a great help to him but was also unrecognized (which is why the image is blurred.) There is a copy of a ticket to an early 1919 interracial game, along with a copy of a wedding invitation to the Fosters' wedding. Foster died in a mental institution in 1930.
© 2001 • 48 by 48 inches • oil on canvas

$5500

Yesterday has gone on too Long.
Yesterday has gone on too Long.

This painting is of Ty Cobb. The shotgun behind his head symbolizes the anxiety he had throughout his life stemming from the fact that his mother shot his father eight days before he was called up to the major leagues. The billboard in the background reads Pop's Root Beer. There is also a painting of a man, and underneath the man reads Home and Away.
The crows in the painting are symbols of African American players and Jim Crow laws of racial segregation. Cobb was purportedly in the KKK. The mask on the field represents the masks that we all wear in our interaction with others. Cobb was born in Georgia 30 years after the Civil War ended, and his grandfather was a colonel in the Confederate Army. It would be rare to meet a person in his situation who wasn't racist.
© 2004 • 48 by 48 inches • oil on canvas

$5500

Unwind Your Mind
Unwind Your Mind

The unraveled baseball draped over the hands symbolizes the mind and heart of every individual. A person should be judged on these characteristics rather than outward physical appearance.
© • 10 by 24 by 8 inches • mixed media on wood

$2500

Black Bird Fly
Black Bird Fly

The crow is a recurring symbol I use for Jim Crow laws. The bird is turned away from a white path with the player in front of a red, white, and blue color scheme.
© 2003 • 20 by 20 by 11 inches • mixed media on canvas

$2500

Money Won't Buy A Soul.
Money Won't Buy A Soul.

Joe Jackson at bat. A stage is to the right of the picture plane. Once we start trying to impress with material possessions, it can never stop.

© 2005 • 20 by 10 inches • oil on canvas •

$1000

The Invisible Man
The Invisible Man

Joe Jackson with 2 examples of brains, one that has difficulty recognizing words, and the other does not. A spiral spinning word game is at the bottom with words like, "sell" and "game." His feet and shoes have disappeared much like his rightful place in the Hall of Fame.

$3000

Forget Yesterday
Forget Yesterday

The player jumping is Jimmy Collins, a Red Sox great. Collins' leadership and keen play helped the Red Sox win their first World Series in 1903. I painted this a week after the Red Sox Won the World Series in 2004.

2004, 48"x 48" Oil On Canvas.

$4500

Rectify My Will.
Rectify My Will.

Ty Cobb featured in a enameled tile. An eerie image in which his face fades into the foreground and background.

Enamel on Metal mounted 5"x 3.75", mounted piece measures 9.5"x8", 1999. $500

8 Men Out.
8 Men Out.

Shoeless Joe Jackson and his seven teamates who were banned from baseball in 1919 are the subject of this painting. Although it was obvious by his play Jackson was innocent of throwing the series, Judge Landis banned him for life. The painting is on a 2" deep wooden box with 8 holes drilled in the face. When you look through the holes you see money attached to the back of the box.
2002. 36 by 30 by 2 inches oil on wood

 $4000

The Descent Of Man.
The Descent Of Man.

This is a famous shot of Ty Cobb sliding hard into Jimmy Austin at third base. A billboard in the background reads, "Austin Steel Factory" in reference to Cobb spiking him with his steel cleats. Another billboard reads, "Damn Yankees," as Cobb was from the South and once said the reason he didn't speak to his teammates was they were all, "Damn Yankees."
The title of the painting refers to a Charles Darwin book.

©1998-2004 • 48 by 96 inches • oil on Masonite

$8500

Trapped In A Box.
Trapped In A Box.

This piece represents Josh Gibson drowning in racism. The face is in front of red, and white stars, and surrounded by blue as if drowning or suffocating. The title is about being trapped in a world in which many people only understand their own microcosm.
© 2000 • 25 by 36 by 6 inches • mixed media on wooden box

$4000

Trapped In A Box (Detail)
Trapped In A Box (Detail)

Mold of face has tear streaming down the cheek.

A Way Out.
A Way Out.

Jack Johnson fought his way out of the poverty of the deep south to become Heavyweight Champion of the World.  Jack also had a penchant for white women, often traveling with more than one at a time. The Mann Act was created to put Johnson in jail for bringing women across state lines for immoral purposes. Jack came from nothing and was pushing the envelope 40 years before anyone had heard of Jackie Robinson.

$2000

Fear Your Inhibitions.
Fear Your Inhibitions.

© 2001 48 by 60 inches oil on canvas

$4000

Feed Your Ego.
Feed Your Ego.

Ty Cobb with various symbols illustrating his desire to be the best at everything by any means. This behavior was based in his insecurities and occurrences that have scarred him mentally.© 2005 • 58 by 60 inches • oil on canvas

 

$3250

Eddie Waitkus Has Been Shot.
Eddie Waitkus Has Been Shot.

Oil On Canvas 2011. $900

Overlooked Unfit Appearance.
Overlooked Unfit Appearance.

The subject of this painting is Satchel Paige. Half of his body is hollow, which represents the respect and dignity denied to him merely because of his skin pigment. A minimalist rectangle protrudes from the missing section of his body. The actual 3-D sculptural aspect forces the viewer to take notice of the minimal form initially, and to create the remainder of the image in their mind. In the center of this image is a small reflective piece

© 2000 48 by 24 inches oil on woodof metal. 

$3750

Subversion.
Subversion.

The hazy ghost like appearance of the figure gives the image the feel of an old, out of focus photograph.  The image is produced by pushing colored sand through a silkscreen onto metal. The metal is then placed in a kiln, melting the sand into glass.
© 1999 12 by 9 inches silkscreen enamel

$850

Tristram
Tristram

The "Grey Eagle" Tris Speaker. One of the greatest defensive and offensive combinations baseball has seen. 11"x 14" Oil On Canvas Board 2007. $400

There Goes The Greatest Hitter Who Ever Lived.
There Goes The Greatest Hitter Who Ever Lived.

Ted Williams going up the stairs in his last game.The three images are Williams in different life stages. The painting is about the life cycle and some sort of afterlife.
© 2003 • 72 by 36 inches • oil on canvas

$3500

None Comes To The Father Except Through Me.
None Comes To The Father Except Through Me.

Ty Cobb, the overbearing patriarch imposing his nonsense on anyone who will listen.© 2005 • 4 by 3 feet • oil on canvas

$3000

Hans Wag
Hans Wag

The greatest shortstop ever Honus Wagner. 72" x 36"  Oil on Canvas 1999. $6000

An Air Of Mystery
An Air Of Mystery

Christy Mathewson is the only pitcher in MLB history to rank in the top ten both in career wins and in career ERA. In 1936, Mathewson was elected into the Baseball Hall Of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members. Mathewson served in the U.S. Army's  Chemical Warfare Service in World War I, and was accidentally exposed to chemical weapons during training; his respiratory system weakened from the exposure, he contracted tuberculosis and subsequently died of the disease in Saranac New York in 1925. Oil oN Canvas 72" x 24" $4500

 

 

I'm Stronger.
I'm Stronger.

This painting depicts Ted Williams. The five marks represent the five years he missed due to his military service in WWII and Korea. Ted would have hit over 700 home runs if not serving in the Marines. The title refers to having difficult times in your life — does this make you stronger, or angry and callous?

© 2003 • 36 by 60 inches • oil on canvas

$3000

The White Josh Gibson.
The White Josh Gibson.

© 2003 • 74 by 63 inches • oil on canvas

$7500

Wish You Were Here
Wish You Were Here

Babe Ruth in a Red Sox uniform – his leg fades as did the curse in 2004. This painting is about a person who waited their entire life to see what he most wanted but unfortunately missed it.
© 2005 • 48 by 48 inches • oil on canvas

$3000

She Left You Paranoid.
She Left You Paranoid.

© 2006 • 30 by 40 inches • oil on canvas

$2250

Quiet Please.
Quiet Please.

© 2009 • 60 by 108 inches • oil on unstretched canvas and material

$3500

I'm Going to Miss You!
I'm Going to Miss You!

Sold Private Collection- Ty Cobb and the myth of hero. The more you learn about people the less heroic they become.

2005 20"x 10" Oil on Canvas.

 

Liar
Liar

2007 Mixed Medium on Wooden Panel. $400

3 Strikes You're Out!
3 Strikes You're Out!

Sold -Private Collection -Babe Ruth lived his life fast and hard. Among his vices were women, liquor, and cigars. He smoked up to 10 cigars a day, and died of throat cancer. The billboards in the background show a woman and a bottle of Jim Beam tipped towards his mouth.
© 2004 • 20 by 24 inches • oil on canvas

The Fat Lady Is Singing.
The Fat Lady Is Singing.

Sold- Private Collection  Rube Waddell© 2009 • 48 by 24 inches • oil on canvas

 

Razor Blade Shine
Razor Blade Shine

Sold Private Collection -Marty Bergen had suffered from spells of nervousness and catatonia; fear of his impulse to violence; loss of memory; and fits of melancholy. On Friday January 19, 1900, the Boston catcher murdered his family with an axe, and decapitated himself with a straight razor. The text at the bottom refers to common advice from baseball coaches to hitters practicing their swing.
© 2004 • 24 by 24 inches • acrylic on canvas

$2500

Strange Fruit
Strange Fruit

SOLD- Private Collection -Racism, religion, and depression are the topics of this painting. The title refers to the Billie Holiday song about lynching. Rube Foster, the originator of the Negro Leagues, was institutionalized at the end of his life before finally hanging himself. I always thought this was an ironic way for him to die, considering the racist lynching going on at the time. The figure on the left is from a manual by the escape artist Houdini.

© 2003 24 by 30 inches • oil on canvas

Private Collection.

Your Eyes Are Burning Holes Through Me.
Your Eyes Are Burning Holes Through Me.

A portrait of Ty Cobb, influenced by Gerhard Richter and Ivan Albright. The painting includes crushed rocks, barbed wire, and tar.
© 2000 36 by 36 inches acrylic

Private Collection
 

Time Is Of The Essence.
Time Is Of The Essence.

This piece is about Josh Gibson, the greatest power hitter the Negro Leagues ever saw. Gibson died at age 37 of brain tumors.The materials are important - the transparency representing the fragility of life. We will all die, and memories of us will fade. The bronze represents the importance of our legacy, and the impact it can have on the next generation.
© 2000
14 by 12 inches transparency, bronze, acrylic in shadow box

Private Collection

Misinforming The Innocent Eyes.
Misinforming The Innocent Eyes.

© 1999 22 by 28 inches acrylic on canvas

Private Collection

No Pink Tea Or MollyCoddles.
No Pink Tea Or MollyCoddles.

The title refers to a Ty Cobb quote that baseball is no place for men that are weak. I tried this stipling effect after becoming interested in the work of Fernand Leger.

1998. 72"x 48" Acrylic on Canvas.

Private Collection

A Bird In The Hand Is Worth Two In The Bush
A Bird In The Hand Is Worth Two In The Bush

This proverb reads, The things we already have are more valuable than the things we only hope to get. © 2004 • 20 by 10 inches • oil on canvas

Private Collection

A Better Place To Hide.
A Better Place To Hide.

Cap Anson was the first player to have 3,000 hits and one of the game's early superstars. He was also extremely adamant about keeping major league baseball segregated. He is in the foreground at a crooked angle, as his perception of the world. The water creates a barrier to isolate him. Crows fly in the background symbolizing Jim Crow laws. The tree is also a symbol of racism for obvious reasons, and used as a formalistic device to create symmetrical balance.
© 2005 • 20 by 20 inches • oil on canvas

Private Collection.

3 x .400.
3 x .400.

© 1999 • 18 by 24 inches • acrylic on canvas •

Private Collection.

Bring Back The Sun
Bring Back The Sun

This painting is about history vs. the present and the desire to return to the past. Nap Lajoie is in black and white, as is an abstract strip on the left side, which represents our past, in a battle with the color (present-future). The sun is painted as a mandala, in the manner a young child paints the sun. Bring back the sun (mandala) means bring back the innocence.
© 2003 • 36 by 24 inches oil on canvas • Private collection

Blank Mirror
Blank Mirror

© 2001 48 by 60 inches oil on canvas

Private Collection

No No Nanette.
No No Nanette.

2000. 40"x 40" Oil on Canvas

Private Collection

The Greatest Shortstop Ever
The Greatest Shortstop Ever

48" x 48" 2001 Oil On Canvas

Private Collection

Leave Them In The Ditch
Leave Them In The Ditch

40"x 30" 2003 Oil on Canvas.

Private Collection

The One And Only
The One And Only

This is a close-up of Ty Cobb, who is the greatest hitter ever, and also one of the most hated players due to his fierce competitiveness.
© 2004 • 24 by 36 inches • oil on canvas

Private Collection

Turn The Key
Turn The Key

© 2003 • 36 by 60 inches • oil on canvas

Private Collection

Short But Sweet.
Short But Sweet.

© 2010 • Oil on canvas, 24 inches by 30 inches

Private Collection

Sink Or Swim
Sink Or Swim

Fielder Jones led the White Sox to the World Championship in 1906. He took losing extremely hard. After a tough loss he packed his things in the middle of the season and moved to Oregon, quitting baseball forever. The painting is about when things get difficult in life, and you feel as though you are drowning. Will you sink or swim?
© 2005 • 20 by 20 inches • oil on canvas •

Private collection

big_watchYourMouth.jpg
The White Line.
The White Line.

This painting shows members of the 1932 Pittsburgh Crawfords - Oscar Charlston, Rap Dixon, Josh Gibson, Judy Johnson, and Jud Wilson. The painting deals with the color barrier and Jim Crow laws.
© 2002 16 by 20 inches oil on canvas

Private Collection

I'm Fading Out.
I'm Fading Out.

Jim Thorpe, quite possibly the greatest athlete ever. I found Native American symbols and wrote a story in a radial manner around the composition. The story is about the birth of a boy who is free of worry. The child is his father's pride. He becomes a man who is lightning fast and swift. He possesses the strength and introspection of a bear. He is on the path of freedom. He meets a girl and begins his journey. The four ages are infant, youth, middle age, and old age. The man dies, and meets his creator.
© 1999 • 30 by 24 inches • oil on canvas •

Private collection

A Swing And A Smash
A Swing And A Smash

© 2002 60 by 36 inches oil on canvas •

Private collection

Control
Control

© 2003 24 by 36 inches, 10 by 8 inches oil on canvas •

Private Collection

Headache Funeral
We Can Dream
Yesterday has gone on too Long.
Unwind Your Mind
Black Bird Fly
Money Won't Buy A Soul.
The Invisible Man
Forget Yesterday
Rectify My Will.
8 Men Out.
The Descent Of Man.
Trapped In A Box.
Trapped In A Box (Detail)
A Way Out.
Fear Your Inhibitions.
Feed Your Ego.
Eddie Waitkus Has Been Shot.
Overlooked Unfit Appearance.
Subversion.
Tristram
There Goes The Greatest Hitter Who Ever Lived.
None Comes To The Father Except Through Me.
Hans Wag
An Air Of Mystery
I'm Stronger.
The White Josh Gibson.
Wish You Were Here
She Left You Paranoid.
Quiet Please.
I'm Going to Miss You!
Liar
3 Strikes You're Out!
The Fat Lady Is Singing.
Razor Blade Shine
Strange Fruit
Your Eyes Are Burning Holes Through Me.
Time Is Of The Essence.
Misinforming The Innocent Eyes.
No Pink Tea Or MollyCoddles.
A Bird In The Hand Is Worth Two In The Bush
A Better Place To Hide.
3 x .400.
Bring Back The Sun
Blank Mirror
No No Nanette.
The Greatest Shortstop Ever
Leave Them In The Ditch
The One And Only
Turn The Key
Short But Sweet.
Sink Or Swim
big_watchYourMouth.jpg
The White Line.
I'm Fading Out.
A Swing And A Smash
Control
Headache Funeral

Cy Young ties his shoes, and asks if the game is over. The game is metaphoric for life. Headache funeral is written in the background with a series of 0's and 9's representing the concept of heaven and hell.

24"x 36"

$3500

We Can Dream

The subject of this painting is Rube Foster, the originator of the Negro leagues. The white baseline above his head represents the white race line, his hat nearly breaking through.The brown dirt under the baseline represents the skin pigment of the African American players and how they were treated. The black and white image is of Foster and his wife. She was a great help to him but was also unrecognized (which is why the image is blurred.) There is a copy of a ticket to an early 1919 interracial game, along with a copy of a wedding invitation to the Fosters' wedding. Foster died in a mental institution in 1930.
© 2001 • 48 by 48 inches • oil on canvas

$5500

Yesterday has gone on too Long.

This painting is of Ty Cobb. The shotgun behind his head symbolizes the anxiety he had throughout his life stemming from the fact that his mother shot his father eight days before he was called up to the major leagues. The billboard in the background reads Pop's Root Beer. There is also a painting of a man, and underneath the man reads Home and Away.
The crows in the painting are symbols of African American players and Jim Crow laws of racial segregation. Cobb was purportedly in the KKK. The mask on the field represents the masks that we all wear in our interaction with others. Cobb was born in Georgia 30 years after the Civil War ended, and his grandfather was a colonel in the Confederate Army. It would be rare to meet a person in his situation who wasn't racist.
© 2004 • 48 by 48 inches • oil on canvas

$5500

Unwind Your Mind

The unraveled baseball draped over the hands symbolizes the mind and heart of every individual. A person should be judged on these characteristics rather than outward physical appearance.
© • 10 by 24 by 8 inches • mixed media on wood

$2500

Black Bird Fly

The crow is a recurring symbol I use for Jim Crow laws. The bird is turned away from a white path with the player in front of a red, white, and blue color scheme.
© 2003 • 20 by 20 by 11 inches • mixed media on canvas

$2500

Money Won't Buy A Soul.

Joe Jackson at bat. A stage is to the right of the picture plane. Once we start trying to impress with material possessions, it can never stop.

© 2005 • 20 by 10 inches • oil on canvas •

$1000

The Invisible Man

Joe Jackson with 2 examples of brains, one that has difficulty recognizing words, and the other does not. A spiral spinning word game is at the bottom with words like, "sell" and "game." His feet and shoes have disappeared much like his rightful place in the Hall of Fame.

$3000

Forget Yesterday

The player jumping is Jimmy Collins, a Red Sox great. Collins' leadership and keen play helped the Red Sox win their first World Series in 1903. I painted this a week after the Red Sox Won the World Series in 2004.

2004, 48"x 48" Oil On Canvas.

$4500

Rectify My Will.

Ty Cobb featured in a enameled tile. An eerie image in which his face fades into the foreground and background.

Enamel on Metal mounted 5"x 3.75", mounted piece measures 9.5"x8", 1999. $500

8 Men Out.

Shoeless Joe Jackson and his seven teamates who were banned from baseball in 1919 are the subject of this painting. Although it was obvious by his play Jackson was innocent of throwing the series, Judge Landis banned him for life. The painting is on a 2" deep wooden box with 8 holes drilled in the face. When you look through the holes you see money attached to the back of the box.
2002. 36 by 30 by 2 inches oil on wood

 $4000

The Descent Of Man.

This is a famous shot of Ty Cobb sliding hard into Jimmy Austin at third base. A billboard in the background reads, "Austin Steel Factory" in reference to Cobb spiking him with his steel cleats. Another billboard reads, "Damn Yankees," as Cobb was from the South and once said the reason he didn't speak to his teammates was they were all, "Damn Yankees."
The title of the painting refers to a Charles Darwin book.

©1998-2004 • 48 by 96 inches • oil on Masonite

$8500

Trapped In A Box.

This piece represents Josh Gibson drowning in racism. The face is in front of red, and white stars, and surrounded by blue as if drowning or suffocating. The title is about being trapped in a world in which many people only understand their own microcosm.
© 2000 • 25 by 36 by 6 inches • mixed media on wooden box

$4000

Trapped In A Box (Detail)

Mold of face has tear streaming down the cheek.

A Way Out.

Jack Johnson fought his way out of the poverty of the deep south to become Heavyweight Champion of the World.  Jack also had a penchant for white women, often traveling with more than one at a time. The Mann Act was created to put Johnson in jail for bringing women across state lines for immoral purposes. Jack came from nothing and was pushing the envelope 40 years before anyone had heard of Jackie Robinson.

$2000

Fear Your Inhibitions.

© 2001 48 by 60 inches oil on canvas

$4000

Feed Your Ego.

Ty Cobb with various symbols illustrating his desire to be the best at everything by any means. This behavior was based in his insecurities and occurrences that have scarred him mentally.© 2005 • 58 by 60 inches • oil on canvas

 

$3250

Eddie Waitkus Has Been Shot.

Oil On Canvas 2011. $900

Overlooked Unfit Appearance.

The subject of this painting is Satchel Paige. Half of his body is hollow, which represents the respect and dignity denied to him merely because of his skin pigment. A minimalist rectangle protrudes from the missing section of his body. The actual 3-D sculptural aspect forces the viewer to take notice of the minimal form initially, and to create the remainder of the image in their mind. In the center of this image is a small reflective piece

© 2000 48 by 24 inches oil on woodof metal. 

$3750

Subversion.

The hazy ghost like appearance of the figure gives the image the feel of an old, out of focus photograph.  The image is produced by pushing colored sand through a silkscreen onto metal. The metal is then placed in a kiln, melting the sand into glass.
© 1999 12 by 9 inches silkscreen enamel

$850

Tristram

The "Grey Eagle" Tris Speaker. One of the greatest defensive and offensive combinations baseball has seen. 11"x 14" Oil On Canvas Board 2007. $400

There Goes The Greatest Hitter Who Ever Lived.

Ted Williams going up the stairs in his last game.The three images are Williams in different life stages. The painting is about the life cycle and some sort of afterlife.
© 2003 • 72 by 36 inches • oil on canvas

$3500

None Comes To The Father Except Through Me.

Ty Cobb, the overbearing patriarch imposing his nonsense on anyone who will listen.© 2005 • 4 by 3 feet • oil on canvas

$3000

Hans Wag

The greatest shortstop ever Honus Wagner. 72" x 36"  Oil on Canvas 1999. $6000

An Air Of Mystery

Christy Mathewson is the only pitcher in MLB history to rank in the top ten both in career wins and in career ERA. In 1936, Mathewson was elected into the Baseball Hall Of Fame as one of its "first five" inaugural members. Mathewson served in the U.S. Army's  Chemical Warfare Service in World War I, and was accidentally exposed to chemical weapons during training; his respiratory system weakened from the exposure, he contracted tuberculosis and subsequently died of the disease in Saranac New York in 1925. Oil oN Canvas 72" x 24" $4500

 

 

I'm Stronger.

This painting depicts Ted Williams. The five marks represent the five years he missed due to his military service in WWII and Korea. Ted would have hit over 700 home runs if not serving in the Marines. The title refers to having difficult times in your life — does this make you stronger, or angry and callous?

© 2003 • 36 by 60 inches • oil on canvas

$3000

The White Josh Gibson.

© 2003 • 74 by 63 inches • oil on canvas

$7500

Wish You Were Here

Babe Ruth in a Red Sox uniform – his leg fades as did the curse in 2004. This painting is about a person who waited their entire life to see what he most wanted but unfortunately missed it.
© 2005 • 48 by 48 inches • oil on canvas

$3000

She Left You Paranoid.

© 2006 • 30 by 40 inches • oil on canvas

$2250

Quiet Please.

© 2009 • 60 by 108 inches • oil on unstretched canvas and material

$3500

I'm Going to Miss You!

Sold Private Collection- Ty Cobb and the myth of hero. The more you learn about people the less heroic they become.

2005 20"x 10" Oil on Canvas.

 

Liar

2007 Mixed Medium on Wooden Panel. $400

3 Strikes You're Out!

Sold -Private Collection -Babe Ruth lived his life fast and hard. Among his vices were women, liquor, and cigars. He smoked up to 10 cigars a day, and died of throat cancer. The billboards in the background show a woman and a bottle of Jim Beam tipped towards his mouth.
© 2004 • 20 by 24 inches • oil on canvas

The Fat Lady Is Singing.

Sold- Private Collection  Rube Waddell© 2009 • 48 by 24 inches • oil on canvas

 

Razor Blade Shine

Sold Private Collection -Marty Bergen had suffered from spells of nervousness and catatonia; fear of his impulse to violence; loss of memory; and fits of melancholy. On Friday January 19, 1900, the Boston catcher murdered his family with an axe, and decapitated himself with a straight razor. The text at the bottom refers to common advice from baseball coaches to hitters practicing their swing.
© 2004 • 24 by 24 inches • acrylic on canvas

$2500

Strange Fruit

SOLD- Private Collection -Racism, religion, and depression are the topics of this painting. The title refers to the Billie Holiday song about lynching. Rube Foster, the originator of the Negro Leagues, was institutionalized at the end of his life before finally hanging himself. I always thought this was an ironic way for him to die, considering the racist lynching going on at the time. The figure on the left is from a manual by the escape artist Houdini.

© 2003 24 by 30 inches • oil on canvas

Private Collection.

Your Eyes Are Burning Holes Through Me.

A portrait of Ty Cobb, influenced by Gerhard Richter and Ivan Albright. The painting includes crushed rocks, barbed wire, and tar.
© 2000 36 by 36 inches acrylic

Private Collection
 

Time Is Of The Essence.

This piece is about Josh Gibson, the greatest power hitter the Negro Leagues ever saw. Gibson died at age 37 of brain tumors.The materials are important - the transparency representing the fragility of life. We will all die, and memories of us will fade. The bronze represents the importance of our legacy, and the impact it can have on the next generation.
© 2000
14 by 12 inches transparency, bronze, acrylic in shadow box

Private Collection

Misinforming The Innocent Eyes.

© 1999 22 by 28 inches acrylic on canvas

Private Collection

No Pink Tea Or MollyCoddles.

The title refers to a Ty Cobb quote that baseball is no place for men that are weak. I tried this stipling effect after becoming interested in the work of Fernand Leger.

1998. 72"x 48" Acrylic on Canvas.

Private Collection

A Bird In The Hand Is Worth Two In The Bush

This proverb reads, The things we already have are more valuable than the things we only hope to get. © 2004 • 20 by 10 inches • oil on canvas

Private Collection

A Better Place To Hide.

Cap Anson was the first player to have 3,000 hits and one of the game's early superstars. He was also extremely adamant about keeping major league baseball segregated. He is in the foreground at a crooked angle, as his perception of the world. The water creates a barrier to isolate him. Crows fly in the background symbolizing Jim Crow laws. The tree is also a symbol of racism for obvious reasons, and used as a formalistic device to create symmetrical balance.
© 2005 • 20 by 20 inches • oil on canvas

Private Collection.

3 x .400.

© 1999 • 18 by 24 inches • acrylic on canvas •

Private Collection.

Bring Back The Sun

This painting is about history vs. the present and the desire to return to the past. Nap Lajoie is in black and white, as is an abstract strip on the left side, which represents our past, in a battle with the color (present-future). The sun is painted as a mandala, in the manner a young child paints the sun. Bring back the sun (mandala) means bring back the innocence.
© 2003 • 36 by 24 inches oil on canvas • Private collection

Blank Mirror

© 2001 48 by 60 inches oil on canvas

Private Collection

No No Nanette.

2000. 40"x 40" Oil on Canvas

Private Collection

The Greatest Shortstop Ever

48" x 48" 2001 Oil On Canvas

Private Collection

Leave Them In The Ditch

40"x 30" 2003 Oil on Canvas.

Private Collection

The One And Only

This is a close-up of Ty Cobb, who is the greatest hitter ever, and also one of the most hated players due to his fierce competitiveness.
© 2004 • 24 by 36 inches • oil on canvas

Private Collection

Turn The Key

© 2003 • 36 by 60 inches • oil on canvas

Private Collection

Short But Sweet.

© 2010 • Oil on canvas, 24 inches by 30 inches

Private Collection

Sink Or Swim

Fielder Jones led the White Sox to the World Championship in 1906. He took losing extremely hard. After a tough loss he packed his things in the middle of the season and moved to Oregon, quitting baseball forever. The painting is about when things get difficult in life, and you feel as though you are drowning. Will you sink or swim?
© 2005 • 20 by 20 inches • oil on canvas •

Private collection

The White Line.

This painting shows members of the 1932 Pittsburgh Crawfords - Oscar Charlston, Rap Dixon, Josh Gibson, Judy Johnson, and Jud Wilson. The painting deals with the color barrier and Jim Crow laws.
© 2002 16 by 20 inches oil on canvas

Private Collection

I'm Fading Out.

Jim Thorpe, quite possibly the greatest athlete ever. I found Native American symbols and wrote a story in a radial manner around the composition. The story is about the birth of a boy who is free of worry. The child is his father's pride. He becomes a man who is lightning fast and swift. He possesses the strength and introspection of a bear. He is on the path of freedom. He meets a girl and begins his journey. The four ages are infant, youth, middle age, and old age. The man dies, and meets his creator.
© 1999 • 30 by 24 inches • oil on canvas •

Private collection

A Swing And A Smash

© 2002 60 by 36 inches oil on canvas •

Private collection

Control

© 2003 24 by 36 inches, 10 by 8 inches oil on canvas •

Private Collection

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