He Who Dares Not Grasp the Thorn Should Never Crave the Rose.
He Who Dares Not Grasp the Thorn Should Never Crave the Rose.

Joe Jackson, possibly the greatest hitter ever, pictured with roses below. 2013, 24" x 20" Oil on Canvas.

$2750

Fortune and Love Favor the Brave.
Fortune and Love Favor the Brave.

Joe Jackson and his wife Katie. She stares at him as their world swirls around them. Their home is upside down in upper left and eyes peer at the couple through the fence. Joe just told her he is banned form Baseball. 2012, Oil on Masonite Panel 36"x 30".

$4000

Don't You Know Who I am?
Don't You Know Who I am?

Our society often allows athletes to play by their own sets of rules. This sense of grandiose entitlement makes one wonder if the old adage, Never meet your heroes is good advice. 2011- 15, 10 x10"  Oil on masonite panels  $3000

I'll Love You Until The Day You Die.
I'll Love You Until The Day You Die.

Ruth Ann Steinhagen became obsessed with Phillies first baseman Eddie Waitkus. She shot him in the Edgewater hotel in Chicago in 1949. This painting shows Ruth and Eddie with an upside down crumbling home spiraling above their heads. 2010 Oil on Masonite Panel 36" x 30"  $3500

Pandemic
Pandemic

Joe Jackson and his wife Katie with an image of a vulture and a coyote battling for food. I am intrigued as to what happened to their relationship once he was banned from the game. The broken telephone wires in the background signify a lack of communication. 2012, Oil on Canvas 24" x 36"

$3500

Pandemic (Closeup)
Pandemic (Closeup)

Joe and Katie / Vulture and Coyote

Roy Hobbs "My Life Didn't Turn Out The Way I Expected."
Roy Hobbs "My Life Didn't Turn Out The Way I Expected."

"The Natural" is by far my favorite baseball film.  The protagonist, Roy states, "My life didn't turn out the way I expected"  upon meeting Iris after a 17 year absence.  I feel this quote can pertain to any person's life. It can be seen as a positive or negative statement. This print measures 11"x 17". A letterpress edit on of 20, with 2 Artists Proofs. Note: Each print has unique ink application so mild variations are to be expected from this image. $99

Image of the letterpress "My Life Didn't.."
Image of the letterpress "My Life Didn't.."
Roy Hobbs "My Dad Always Wanted Me To Be A Baseball Player."
Roy Hobbs "My Dad Always Wanted Me To Be A Baseball Player."

Another quote from "The Natural," Roy states, "My dad wanted me to be a baseball player" after Pop Fischer tells him, "My mother wanted me to be a farmer." The second print is larger measuring 15.75 x 19.75. Twenty regular edition prints and 2 artist Proofs. Note: Each print has unique ink application so mild variations are to be expected from this image. $99

Running the Press for "My Dad Always..."
Running the Press for "My Dad Always..."
Should I Kiss You Or Kill You?
Should I Kiss You Or Kill You?

© 2009 • 36 by 30 inches • oil on Masonite board

$3500

Bring Home The Bacon
Bring Home The Bacon

An image of an aged Joe Jackson about to crack an egg on a burner that is far too hot. Eight pieces of bacon are nailed to the wall representing the 8 White Sox to gamble on the 1919 Series. The flies that buzz around the rotting meat represent the gamblers and the owners, who promised the players a $20,000 payday but only delivered $5000. Outside the window is Katie, Joe's wife, her world turned upside down with their livelihood taken away.

© 2007 • 48 by 48 inches • oil, plastic flies on canvas

$5500

The Birdman.
The Birdman.

Charles "Old Hoss" Radbourn was known as one of the most dominant 19th century hurlers, but he gained notoriety of another sort. During a Boston/New York team photograph in 1886, he became the first public figure to be photographed extending his middle digit to the camera.

2013, Oil On Canvas 24"x 30"

$2750

Happy Accident.
Happy Accident.

Mordecai Centennial Brown lost two fingers on his right hand in a farm-machinery accident, later gaining him the name "Three Finger Brown." Overcoming this handicap and turning it to his advantage, he became one of the elite pitchers of his era. This painting shows a pair of severed fingers in a pool of blood.

2012, 20"x 20" Oil on Canvas with ceramic fingers.

$2000

It's Sinking In.
It's Sinking In.

A guard watches Cubs pitcher Orval Overall warming up and realizes that this is his life. He is normal, boring, and unspectacular. He will never receive the adulation of the famous but drown in the boring, mundane anonymity he loathes.

© 2010 • Oil on Masonite, 36 inches by 30 inches

$3000

Don't Worry About Me, Save Yourself.
Don't Worry About Me, Save Yourself.

Billy Sunday played professional baseball during the 1880's, and later became a religious con man. Between 1908 and 1920, Sunday earned over a million dollars. An average worker during the same period earned less than $14,000 annually. I find the correlation that those who are successful see between success and religion interesting. When modern athletes point to the sky giving thanks for a home run I wonder whether their actions might speak louder than their public posturing. In this image the Jesus fish have turned into piranhas.

© 2008 • 24 by 20 inches • oil on Masonite panel

$2500

 

 

 

Say It Don't Spray It.
Say It Don't Spray It.

Joe Jackson sits on trial. A panel of gossiping mouths spreads rumors of gambling. They all promised to keep their mouths shut, but it just didn't work out that way. The cork pops off the champagne bottle.

© 2009 • 40 by 30 inches, and 48 by 24 inches • oil on Masonite panel; mouth molds on wood panel

$4500

You're A Pawn In The Game
You're A Pawn In The Game

Christy Mathewson, master pitcher and chess player. I made this painting as a comment on war in the age of the military industrial complex.

©2007 • 48 by 60 inches • oil, plastic army figures on canvas

$5000

It's Hard To Look In The Mirror
It's Hard To Look In The Mirror

The Black Sox scandal. Abe Attell was the middle man between the players and fix mastermind Arnold Rothstein. Abe is shown with an image of a young boy, a boxing glove in the middle and torn children's school work.
© 2008 • mixed media collage

$2000

He Who Dares Not Grasp the Thorn Should Never Crave the Rose.
Fortune and Love Favor the Brave.
Don't You Know Who I am?
I'll Love You Until The Day You Die.
Pandemic
Pandemic (Closeup)
Roy Hobbs "My Life Didn't Turn Out The Way I Expected."
Image of the letterpress "My Life Didn't.."
Roy Hobbs "My Dad Always Wanted Me To Be A Baseball Player."
Running the Press for "My Dad Always..."
Should I Kiss You Or Kill You?
Bring Home The Bacon
The Birdman.
Happy Accident.
It's Sinking In.
Don't Worry About Me, Save Yourself.
Say It Don't Spray It.
You're A Pawn In The Game
It's Hard To Look In The Mirror
He Who Dares Not Grasp the Thorn Should Never Crave the Rose.

Joe Jackson, possibly the greatest hitter ever, pictured with roses below. 2013, 24" x 20" Oil on Canvas.

$2750

Fortune and Love Favor the Brave.

Joe Jackson and his wife Katie. She stares at him as their world swirls around them. Their home is upside down in upper left and eyes peer at the couple through the fence. Joe just told her he is banned form Baseball. 2012, Oil on Masonite Panel 36"x 30".

$4000

Don't You Know Who I am?

Our society often allows athletes to play by their own sets of rules. This sense of grandiose entitlement makes one wonder if the old adage, Never meet your heroes is good advice. 2011- 15, 10 x10"  Oil on masonite panels  $3000

I'll Love You Until The Day You Die.

Ruth Ann Steinhagen became obsessed with Phillies first baseman Eddie Waitkus. She shot him in the Edgewater hotel in Chicago in 1949. This painting shows Ruth and Eddie with an upside down crumbling home spiraling above their heads. 2010 Oil on Masonite Panel 36" x 30"  $3500

Pandemic

Joe Jackson and his wife Katie with an image of a vulture and a coyote battling for food. I am intrigued as to what happened to their relationship once he was banned from the game. The broken telephone wires in the background signify a lack of communication. 2012, Oil on Canvas 24" x 36"

$3500

Pandemic (Closeup)

Joe and Katie / Vulture and Coyote

Roy Hobbs "My Life Didn't Turn Out The Way I Expected."

"The Natural" is by far my favorite baseball film.  The protagonist, Roy states, "My life didn't turn out the way I expected"  upon meeting Iris after a 17 year absence.  I feel this quote can pertain to any person's life. It can be seen as a positive or negative statement. This print measures 11"x 17". A letterpress edit on of 20, with 2 Artists Proofs. Note: Each print has unique ink application so mild variations are to be expected from this image. $99

Image of the letterpress "My Life Didn't.."
Roy Hobbs "My Dad Always Wanted Me To Be A Baseball Player."

Another quote from "The Natural," Roy states, "My dad wanted me to be a baseball player" after Pop Fischer tells him, "My mother wanted me to be a farmer." The second print is larger measuring 15.75 x 19.75. Twenty regular edition prints and 2 artist Proofs. Note: Each print has unique ink application so mild variations are to be expected from this image. $99

Running the Press for "My Dad Always..."
Should I Kiss You Or Kill You?

© 2009 • 36 by 30 inches • oil on Masonite board

$3500

Bring Home The Bacon

An image of an aged Joe Jackson about to crack an egg on a burner that is far too hot. Eight pieces of bacon are nailed to the wall representing the 8 White Sox to gamble on the 1919 Series. The flies that buzz around the rotting meat represent the gamblers and the owners, who promised the players a $20,000 payday but only delivered $5000. Outside the window is Katie, Joe's wife, her world turned upside down with their livelihood taken away.

© 2007 • 48 by 48 inches • oil, plastic flies on canvas

$5500

The Birdman.

Charles "Old Hoss" Radbourn was known as one of the most dominant 19th century hurlers, but he gained notoriety of another sort. During a Boston/New York team photograph in 1886, he became the first public figure to be photographed extending his middle digit to the camera.

2013, Oil On Canvas 24"x 30"

$2750

Happy Accident.

Mordecai Centennial Brown lost two fingers on his right hand in a farm-machinery accident, later gaining him the name "Three Finger Brown." Overcoming this handicap and turning it to his advantage, he became one of the elite pitchers of his era. This painting shows a pair of severed fingers in a pool of blood.

2012, 20"x 20" Oil on Canvas with ceramic fingers.

$2000

It's Sinking In.

A guard watches Cubs pitcher Orval Overall warming up and realizes that this is his life. He is normal, boring, and unspectacular. He will never receive the adulation of the famous but drown in the boring, mundane anonymity he loathes.

© 2010 • Oil on Masonite, 36 inches by 30 inches

$3000

Don't Worry About Me, Save Yourself.

Billy Sunday played professional baseball during the 1880's, and later became a religious con man. Between 1908 and 1920, Sunday earned over a million dollars. An average worker during the same period earned less than $14,000 annually. I find the correlation that those who are successful see between success and religion interesting. When modern athletes point to the sky giving thanks for a home run I wonder whether their actions might speak louder than their public posturing. In this image the Jesus fish have turned into piranhas.

© 2008 • 24 by 20 inches • oil on Masonite panel

$2500

 

 

 

Say It Don't Spray It.

Joe Jackson sits on trial. A panel of gossiping mouths spreads rumors of gambling. They all promised to keep their mouths shut, but it just didn't work out that way. The cork pops off the champagne bottle.

© 2009 • 40 by 30 inches, and 48 by 24 inches • oil on Masonite panel; mouth molds on wood panel

$4500

You're A Pawn In The Game

Christy Mathewson, master pitcher and chess player. I made this painting as a comment on war in the age of the military industrial complex.

©2007 • 48 by 60 inches • oil, plastic army figures on canvas

$5000

It's Hard To Look In The Mirror

The Black Sox scandal. Abe Attell was the middle man between the players and fix mastermind Arnold Rothstein. Abe is shown with an image of a young boy, a boxing glove in the middle and torn children's school work.
© 2008 • mixed media collage

$2000

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