Be Great, Show No Fear Around Me.
Be Great, Show No Fear Around Me.

Ty Cobb broke into major league baseball with the Tigers in August 1905, just three weeks after his mother, Amanda Cobb, had been arrested on charges of voluntary manslaughter in the shooting death of Cobb’s father, William Herschel Cobb. Amanda  said she thought her husband was an intruder trying to enter their house through the bedroom window when she shot him twice. But there had been rumors in town that William suspected his wife of infidelity and had unexpectedly returned home late that fateful evening, when she believed him to be out of town. Ty later stated, "I did it for my father. He never got to see me play... but I knew he was watching me, and I never let him down." See additional images for continued description.....

Be Great.... Close up of ladder....
Be Great.... Close up of ladder....

The triptych consists of a ladder with text taken from a  letter Herschel Cobb wrote to a 15 year old Ty . Certain statements seemed appropriate for this story.  Each step of the ladder has a different sentence written on it. "To have eyes that really see, ears that..., conquer your anger and wild passions that...., degrade your dignity and belittle your manhood...., perpetual guidance of the better angel of your nature...., drive out the demon that lurks in all human blood." See additional images for more information on this piece....

 

 

Be Great .. close up
Be Great .. close up

The image of the woman is from the early 20th century but not actually Amanda, the final painting is the Cobb house, the barren trees have a splattering of blood red leaves, and a ladder rests against the house.

Be Great... close up
Be Great... close up

Oil and Acrylic Mixed Media 2014. Dimensions LAdder 48"x 12", portrait of woman 10"x 8", and house 23"x 18".  $2500

He Who Dares Not Grasp the Thorn Should Never Crave the Rose.
He Who Dares Not Grasp the Thorn Should Never Crave the Rose.

Joe Jackson, possibly the greatest hitter ever, pictured with roses below. 2013, 24" x 20" Oil on Canvas.

$2750

The Meeting Of The Minds.
The Meeting Of The Minds.

A not so happy meeting on the mound that found John Roseboro with a bat across his head courtesy of Juan Marichal. Sandy Koufax looks on in shock. 30"x40" Oil on Canvas. 2014 $3750

Sharks
Sharks

Jackie Robinson playing cards with 3 men who have not so trusting expressions. The title refers to "card sharks" as well as the bubble above their heads which shows the ocean with sharks on the hunt. Oil on Masonite Panel 31.75"x 35.5" 2014.  $3250

 

 

Aperture.
Aperture.

In 1946 Jackie Robinson played minor league baseball for the Montreal Royals. The Canadian populous was much more tolerant of the African American population. Robinson was preparing for a less hospitable reception in the U.S. as Branch Rickey introduced him as a member of the parent club, the Brooklyn Dodgers.
Oil On Canvas  40"x30", 2014. $3500

Fortune and Love Favor the Brave.
Fortune and Love Favor the Brave.

Joe Jackson and his wife Katie. She stares at him as their world swirls around them. Their home is upside down in upper left and eyes peer at the couple through the fence. Joe just told her he is banned form Baseball. 2012, Oil on Masonite Panel 36"x 30".

$4000

I'll Love You Until The Day You Die.
I'll Love You Until The Day You Die.

Ruth Ann Steinhagen became obsessed with Phillies first baseman Eddie Waitkus. She shot him in the Edgewater hotel in Chicago in 1949. This painting shows Ruth and Eddie with an upside down crumbling home spiraling above their heads. 2010 Oil on Masonite Panel 36" x 30"  $3000

Pandemic
Pandemic

Joe Jackson and his wife Katie with an image of a vulture and a coyote battling for food. I am intrigued as to what happened to their relationship once he was banned from the game. The broken telephone wires in the background signify a lack of communication. 2012, Oil on Canvas 24" x 36"

$3500

Pandemic (Closeup)
Pandemic (Closeup)

Joe and Katie / Vulture and Coyote

Running the Press for "My Dad Always..."
Running the Press for "My Dad Always..."
Roy Hobbs "My Life Didn't Turn Out The Way I Expected."
Roy Hobbs "My Life Didn't Turn Out The Way I Expected."

"The Natural" is by far my favorite baseball film.  The protagonist, Roy states, "My life didn't turn out the way I expected"  upon meeting Iris after a 17 year absence.  I feel this quote can pertain to any person's life. It can be seen as a positive or negative statement. This print measures 11"x 17". A letterpress edit on of 20, with 2 Artists Proofs. Note: Each print has unique ink application so mild variations are to be expected from this image. $99

Image of the letterpress "My Life Didn't.."
Image of the letterpress "My Life Didn't.."
Roy Hobbs "My Dad Always Wanted Me To Be A Baseball Player."
Roy Hobbs "My Dad Always Wanted Me To Be A Baseball Player."

Another quote from "The Natural," Roy states, "My dad wanted me to be a baseball player" after Pop Fischer tells him, "My mother wanted me to be a farmer." The second print is larger measuring 15.75 x 19.75. Twenty regular edition prints and 2 artist Proofs. Note: Each print has unique ink application so mild variations are to be expected from this image. $99

Should I Kiss You Or Kill You?
Should I Kiss You Or Kill You?

© 2009 • 36 by 30 inches • oil on Masonite board

$3500

Don't You Know Who I am?
Don't You Know Who I am?

Our society often allows athletes to play by their own sets of rules. This sense of grandiose entitlement makes one wonder if the old adage, Never meet your heroes is good advice. 2011- 15, 10 x10"  Oil on masonite panels  $3000

Bring Home The Bacon
Bring Home The Bacon

An image of an aged Joe Jackson about to crack an egg on a burner that is far too hot. Eight pieces of bacon are nailed to the wall representing the 8 White Sox to gamble on the 1919 Series. The flies that buzz around the rotting meat represent the gamblers and the owners, who promised the players a $20,000 payday but only delivered $5000. Outside the window is Katie, Joe's wife, her world turned upside down with their livelihood taken away.

© 2007 • 48 by 48 inches • oil, plastic flies on canvas

$5500

The Birdman.
The Birdman.

Charles "Old Hoss" Radbourn was known as one of the most dominant 19th century hurlers, but he gained notoriety of another sort. During a Boston/New York team photograph in 1886, he became the first public figure to be photographed extending his middle digit to the camera.

2013, Oil On Canvas 24"x 30"

$2750

Happy Accident.
Happy Accident.

Mordecai Centennial Brown lost two fingers on his right hand in a farm-machinery accident, later gaining him the name "Three Finger Brown." Overcoming this handicap and turning it to his advantage, he became one of the elite pitchers of his era. This painting shows a pair of severed fingers in a pool of blood.

2012, 20"x 20" Oil on Canvas with ceramic fingers.

$2000

It's Sinking In.
It's Sinking In.

A guard watches Cubs pitcher Orval Overall warming up and realizes that this is his life. He is normal, boring, and unspectacular. He will never receive the adulation of the famous but drown in the boring, mundane anonymity he loathes.

© 2010 • Oil on Masonite, 36 inches by 30 inches

$3000

Don't Worry About Me, Save Yourself.
Don't Worry About Me, Save Yourself.

Billy Sunday played professional baseball during the 1880's, and later became a religious con man. Between 1908 and 1920, Sunday earned over a million dollars. An average worker during the same period earned less than $14,000 annually. I find the correlation that those who are successful see between success and religion interesting. When modern athletes point to the sky giving thanks for a home run I wonder whether their actions might speak louder than their public posturing. In this image the Jesus fish have turned into piranhas.

© 2008 • 24 by 20 inches • oil on Masonite panel

$1500

 

 

 

For The Benefit Of Lillian.
For The Benefit Of Lillian.

SOLD- Private Collection- An image of the Addie Joss benefit game with Joss in the background. Baseball player turned Evangelist Billy Sunday performed the sermon, that is the text in the background. Lillian was the name of Addie's wife. 2014, Oil on Canvas 36"x48".

Say It Don't Spray It.
Say It Don't Spray It.

Joe Jackson sits on trial. A panel of gossiping mouths spreads rumors of gambling. They all promised to keep their mouths shut, but it just didn't work out that way. The cork pops off the champagne bottle.

© 2009 • 40 by 30 inches, and 48 by 24 inches • oil on Masonite panel; mouth molds on wood panel

$4500

You're A Pawn In The Game
You're A Pawn In The Game

Christy Mathewson, master pitcher and chess player. I made this painting as a comment on war in the age of the military industrial complex.

©2007 • 48 by 60 inches • oil, plastic army figures on canvas

$5000

IMG_2158.JPG
IMG_2157.JPG
IMG_2161.JPG
The Bughouse Victor.
The Bughouse Victor.

Sold -Private Collection- Charles "Victory" Faust is the subject of this dyptich. Faust suffered from a mental condition limiting his cognitive ability. He was told by a fortune teller that he would pitch the NY Giants to the World Series. He met John McGraw the manager of the team who allowed him to hang around the team because of his eccentric behavior. It just so happened they went on a winning streak and Victory had earned his stay as a mascot. He was even allowed to pitch in a few mop up games. Once the team stated to lose he was sent packing, and ended up in a mental institution, where he eventually died. The painting on the left shows a postcard view of the mental institution with the words "Victory" above it and a fortune teller hand. The canvas on the right is the back of the postcard written to John McGraw asking to get back with the team. 2014 Oil on Canvas 44"x30" each canvas.

It's Hard To Look In The Mirror
It's Hard To Look In The Mirror

The Black Sox scandal. Abe Attell was the middle man between the players and fix mastermind Arnold Rothstein. Abe is shown with an image of a young boy, a boxing glove in the middle and torn children's school work.
© 2008 • mixed media collage

$2000

Be Great, Show No Fear Around Me.
Be Great.... Close up of ladder....
Be Great .. close up
Be Great... close up
He Who Dares Not Grasp the Thorn Should Never Crave the Rose.
The Meeting Of The Minds.
Sharks
Aperture.
Fortune and Love Favor the Brave.
I'll Love You Until The Day You Die.
Pandemic
Pandemic (Closeup)
Running the Press for "My Dad Always..."
Roy Hobbs "My Life Didn't Turn Out The Way I Expected."
Image of the letterpress "My Life Didn't.."
Roy Hobbs "My Dad Always Wanted Me To Be A Baseball Player."
Should I Kiss You Or Kill You?
Don't You Know Who I am?
Bring Home The Bacon
The Birdman.
Happy Accident.
It's Sinking In.
Don't Worry About Me, Save Yourself.
For The Benefit Of Lillian.
Say It Don't Spray It.
You're A Pawn In The Game
IMG_2158.JPG
IMG_2157.JPG
IMG_2161.JPG
The Bughouse Victor.
It's Hard To Look In The Mirror
Be Great, Show No Fear Around Me.

Ty Cobb broke into major league baseball with the Tigers in August 1905, just three weeks after his mother, Amanda Cobb, had been arrested on charges of voluntary manslaughter in the shooting death of Cobb’s father, William Herschel Cobb. Amanda  said she thought her husband was an intruder trying to enter their house through the bedroom window when she shot him twice. But there had been rumors in town that William suspected his wife of infidelity and had unexpectedly returned home late that fateful evening, when she believed him to be out of town. Ty later stated, "I did it for my father. He never got to see me play... but I knew he was watching me, and I never let him down." See additional images for continued description.....

Be Great.... Close up of ladder....

The triptych consists of a ladder with text taken from a  letter Herschel Cobb wrote to a 15 year old Ty . Certain statements seemed appropriate for this story.  Each step of the ladder has a different sentence written on it. "To have eyes that really see, ears that..., conquer your anger and wild passions that...., degrade your dignity and belittle your manhood...., perpetual guidance of the better angel of your nature...., drive out the demon that lurks in all human blood." See additional images for more information on this piece....

 

 

Be Great .. close up

The image of the woman is from the early 20th century but not actually Amanda, the final painting is the Cobb house, the barren trees have a splattering of blood red leaves, and a ladder rests against the house.

Be Great... close up

Oil and Acrylic Mixed Media 2014. Dimensions LAdder 48"x 12", portrait of woman 10"x 8", and house 23"x 18".  $2500

He Who Dares Not Grasp the Thorn Should Never Crave the Rose.

Joe Jackson, possibly the greatest hitter ever, pictured with roses below. 2013, 24" x 20" Oil on Canvas.

$2750

The Meeting Of The Minds.

A not so happy meeting on the mound that found John Roseboro with a bat across his head courtesy of Juan Marichal. Sandy Koufax looks on in shock. 30"x40" Oil on Canvas. 2014 $3750

Sharks

Jackie Robinson playing cards with 3 men who have not so trusting expressions. The title refers to "card sharks" as well as the bubble above their heads which shows the ocean with sharks on the hunt. Oil on Masonite Panel 31.75"x 35.5" 2014.  $3250

 

 

Aperture.

In 1946 Jackie Robinson played minor league baseball for the Montreal Royals. The Canadian populous was much more tolerant of the African American population. Robinson was preparing for a less hospitable reception in the U.S. as Branch Rickey introduced him as a member of the parent club, the Brooklyn Dodgers.
Oil On Canvas  40"x30", 2014. $3500

Fortune and Love Favor the Brave.

Joe Jackson and his wife Katie. She stares at him as their world swirls around them. Their home is upside down in upper left and eyes peer at the couple through the fence. Joe just told her he is banned form Baseball. 2012, Oil on Masonite Panel 36"x 30".

$4000

I'll Love You Until The Day You Die.

Ruth Ann Steinhagen became obsessed with Phillies first baseman Eddie Waitkus. She shot him in the Edgewater hotel in Chicago in 1949. This painting shows Ruth and Eddie with an upside down crumbling home spiraling above their heads. 2010 Oil on Masonite Panel 36" x 30"  $3000

Pandemic

Joe Jackson and his wife Katie with an image of a vulture and a coyote battling for food. I am intrigued as to what happened to their relationship once he was banned from the game. The broken telephone wires in the background signify a lack of communication. 2012, Oil on Canvas 24" x 36"

$3500

Pandemic (Closeup)

Joe and Katie / Vulture and Coyote

Running the Press for "My Dad Always..."
Roy Hobbs "My Life Didn't Turn Out The Way I Expected."

"The Natural" is by far my favorite baseball film.  The protagonist, Roy states, "My life didn't turn out the way I expected"  upon meeting Iris after a 17 year absence.  I feel this quote can pertain to any person's life. It can be seen as a positive or negative statement. This print measures 11"x 17". A letterpress edit on of 20, with 2 Artists Proofs. Note: Each print has unique ink application so mild variations are to be expected from this image. $99

Image of the letterpress "My Life Didn't.."
Roy Hobbs "My Dad Always Wanted Me To Be A Baseball Player."

Another quote from "The Natural," Roy states, "My dad wanted me to be a baseball player" after Pop Fischer tells him, "My mother wanted me to be a farmer." The second print is larger measuring 15.75 x 19.75. Twenty regular edition prints and 2 artist Proofs. Note: Each print has unique ink application so mild variations are to be expected from this image. $99

Should I Kiss You Or Kill You?

© 2009 • 36 by 30 inches • oil on Masonite board

$3500

Don't You Know Who I am?

Our society often allows athletes to play by their own sets of rules. This sense of grandiose entitlement makes one wonder if the old adage, Never meet your heroes is good advice. 2011- 15, 10 x10"  Oil on masonite panels  $3000

Bring Home The Bacon

An image of an aged Joe Jackson about to crack an egg on a burner that is far too hot. Eight pieces of bacon are nailed to the wall representing the 8 White Sox to gamble on the 1919 Series. The flies that buzz around the rotting meat represent the gamblers and the owners, who promised the players a $20,000 payday but only delivered $5000. Outside the window is Katie, Joe's wife, her world turned upside down with their livelihood taken away.

© 2007 • 48 by 48 inches • oil, plastic flies on canvas

$5500

The Birdman.

Charles "Old Hoss" Radbourn was known as one of the most dominant 19th century hurlers, but he gained notoriety of another sort. During a Boston/New York team photograph in 1886, he became the first public figure to be photographed extending his middle digit to the camera.

2013, Oil On Canvas 24"x 30"

$2750

Happy Accident.

Mordecai Centennial Brown lost two fingers on his right hand in a farm-machinery accident, later gaining him the name "Three Finger Brown." Overcoming this handicap and turning it to his advantage, he became one of the elite pitchers of his era. This painting shows a pair of severed fingers in a pool of blood.

2012, 20"x 20" Oil on Canvas with ceramic fingers.

$2000

It's Sinking In.

A guard watches Cubs pitcher Orval Overall warming up and realizes that this is his life. He is normal, boring, and unspectacular. He will never receive the adulation of the famous but drown in the boring, mundane anonymity he loathes.

© 2010 • Oil on Masonite, 36 inches by 30 inches

$3000

Don't Worry About Me, Save Yourself.

Billy Sunday played professional baseball during the 1880's, and later became a religious con man. Between 1908 and 1920, Sunday earned over a million dollars. An average worker during the same period earned less than $14,000 annually. I find the correlation that those who are successful see between success and religion interesting. When modern athletes point to the sky giving thanks for a home run I wonder whether their actions might speak louder than their public posturing. In this image the Jesus fish have turned into piranhas.

© 2008 • 24 by 20 inches • oil on Masonite panel

$1500

 

 

 

For The Benefit Of Lillian.

SOLD- Private Collection- An image of the Addie Joss benefit game with Joss in the background. Baseball player turned Evangelist Billy Sunday performed the sermon, that is the text in the background. Lillian was the name of Addie's wife. 2014, Oil on Canvas 36"x48".

Say It Don't Spray It.

Joe Jackson sits on trial. A panel of gossiping mouths spreads rumors of gambling. They all promised to keep their mouths shut, but it just didn't work out that way. The cork pops off the champagne bottle.

© 2009 • 40 by 30 inches, and 48 by 24 inches • oil on Masonite panel; mouth molds on wood panel

$4500

You're A Pawn In The Game

Christy Mathewson, master pitcher and chess player. I made this painting as a comment on war in the age of the military industrial complex.

©2007 • 48 by 60 inches • oil, plastic army figures on canvas

$5000

The Bughouse Victor.

Sold -Private Collection- Charles "Victory" Faust is the subject of this dyptich. Faust suffered from a mental condition limiting his cognitive ability. He was told by a fortune teller that he would pitch the NY Giants to the World Series. He met John McGraw the manager of the team who allowed him to hang around the team because of his eccentric behavior. It just so happened they went on a winning streak and Victory had earned his stay as a mascot. He was even allowed to pitch in a few mop up games. Once the team stated to lose he was sent packing, and ended up in a mental institution, where he eventually died. The painting on the left shows a postcard view of the mental institution with the words "Victory" above it and a fortune teller hand. The canvas on the right is the back of the postcard written to John McGraw asking to get back with the team. 2014 Oil on Canvas 44"x30" each canvas.

It's Hard To Look In The Mirror

The Black Sox scandal. Abe Attell was the middle man between the players and fix mastermind Arnold Rothstein. Abe is shown with an image of a young boy, a boxing glove in the middle and torn children's school work.
© 2008 • mixed media collage

$2000

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